first garden sprouts
Garden

First Garden Post!

It’s more than halfway into 2019 and I finally got around to documenting what’s going on with my garden! Better late than never, right? ๐Ÿ™‚

Why we started this garden

I’ve always been interested in growing my own food. I’ve taken tiny steps to do this before by starting sprouts in jars indoors and also growing herbs in small containers just outside the house. Both were surprisingly easy to do with a lot of return for the effort I put in. But I’ve never tried anything bigger than that until this year.

A while back, my significant other and I bought a house together with a good bit of land that seemed perfect for gardening. We both share a dream of eventually growing most of the food we eat ourselves, so this was the perfect place to embark on that journey together.

About Our Garden

Location

To start things off, I’d like to give an overview of my geographical situation. We live in a house on about 3.5 acres of land in the South. According to the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map, we’re in Zone 7B. What does that mean? I live in an area where the annual minimum temperature is between 5-10ยบF, giving an approximate growing season from February to November. Lots of time to grow lots of veggies!

Water

What about water? We have a well, but no above-ground water features such as a lake or creek directly on the property. Luckily there is a spigot in the middle of a field which is near where we’ve started planting. The general area is very humid and we often get storms during the summer months.

Soil

As for our soil, its mostly clay. It gets pretty hard when dry, so we try to moisten the ground a bit before tilling up any new areas. I’ve read that this type of soil holds in water and nutrients well, so it sounds like I don’t need to fertilize and water as much as if I had another soil type to work with.

I would say we’re in a pretty great spot to grow a variety of fruits and vegetables. I’m really excited to document our first garden and reap the many benefits of growing our own food organically. We’ll make lots of mistakes, but as long as we learn lessons from those experiences, were they really mistakes at all? Anyhow, we’ve got nothing to lose by getting out there, getting dirty, and trying. It’s the only way to grow.

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